Voice & Gesture

Voice & Gesture

I’m perpetually confused by electric cars because they start making noises the minute you sit down. I don’t need a happy dance, car - I just need to to get me places. If you forget to press the brake while pressing the power button, you get a little reminder visual reminder.

I’m perpetually confused by electric cars because they start making noises the minute you sit down. I don’t need a happy dance, car - I just need to to get me places. If you forget to press the brake while pressing the power button, you get a little reminder visual reminder.

via Fast Company Vibrating Shoes Help The Blind (And Anyone Else) Get Around
I’m going to be the dumb user now. It took me a while to work out what this arrow key graphic was telling me #polarb Twitter / ajdf

Keyboard shortcuts are still harder than you think. This UI isn’t available on Polar anymore (they’ve gone solely to a publisher plug-in/app model), but it does a fine job of illustrating the problems with relying on keyboard shortcuts.
I’m going to be the dumb user now. It took me a while to work out what this arrow key graphic was telling me #polarb Twitter / ajdf

Keyboard shortcuts are still harder than you think. This UI isn’t available on Polar anymore (they’ve gone solely to a publisher plug-in/app model), but it does a fine job of illustrating the problems with relying on keyboard shortcuts.

With Credibility on Line, World Cup Turns to Technology - NYTimes.com

GoalControl’s system works with a set of 14 cameras, with seven arrayed in a semicircle on the catwalks above, watching each goal. The cameras capture up to 500 frames per second from multiple vantage points to track the continuous position of the ball within a centimeter or so. If it crosses the goal line, a digital watch worn by the referee, his two linesmen and the fourth official at midfield flashes the word “GOAL” within a second. Referees will be notified on digital watches when high-speed cameras determine that a goal has been scored.

With Credibility on Line, World Cup Turns to Technology - NYTimes.com

GoalControl’s system works with a set of 14 cameras, with seven arrayed in a semicircle on the catwalks above, watching each goal. The cameras capture up to 500 frames per second from multiple vantage points to track the continuous position of the ball within a centimeter or so. If it crosses the goal line, a digital watch worn by the referee, his two linesmen and the fourth official at midfield flashes the word “GOAL” within a second. Referees will be notified on digital watches when high-speed cameras determine that a goal has been scored.

FingerSense: A way to think with your hands

What if we stopped creating new gestures and started using more body parts? FingerSense from Qeexo can tell the difference between your finger, fingernail, and thumb, and can differentiate between ends of a stylus, without using Bluetooth the way Pencil does.

FingerSense Overview (by Qeexo)

Imagine interactive electronic books that never need batteries or charging.

… a new energy harvesting technology that generates electrical energy from a user’s interactions with paper-like materials. The energy harvesters are flexible, light, and inexpensive, and they utilize a user’s gestures such as tapping, touching, rubbing and sliding to generate energy. The harvested energy is then used to actuate LEDs, e-paper displays and other devices to create interactive applications for books and other printed media.

Paper Generators: Harvesting Energy from Touching, Rubbing & Sliding (by DisneyResearchHub)

Pay with your hand using vein scanning

How it works (from the customer perspective):

  • Cashier totals your purchase
  • You look at the readout to confirm price
  • Enter your 4-digit pin
  • Put your hand on the scanner so it can read your vein structure
  • Your purchase is added to your tab and you’re billed twice a month by direct debit

There are some limits on the service, like a maximum purchase limit of 2,500 Swedish Kroner (about $375 USD) per 2-week billing period. Note that that the PIN isn’t a secret set of numbers, it’s the last four digits of your phone number. It probably helps speed up the vein map confirmation and as noted in the video, gives the customer a chance to double-check the purchase amount.

This is a place where the interaction could be seamless without any involvement from the user (think near-field communication), but the moment of entering the PIN returns a feeling of control over the environment back to the user. This reminds me of placebo interfaces, like fake thermostats in office buildings and elevator buttons that don’t work. Curious about those? Read more about Illusion of control.

Can someone chop off your hand to use it for payment? According to Quixter, the biometric tool only works if blood is pumping through your veins.